Mother’s Day Every Day?

Some might say that every day is Mother’s Day, considering the everyday sacrifices women make for their families. But if that were the case, those of us in the business of transporting flowers would be very busy indeed.

The modern Mother’s Day that originated in the U.S. in the early 20th century initially involved wearing a white carnation for mom every year on the second Sunday of May. Since then, flowers have been inextricably linked to this holiday.

Motherhood is celebrated in many other parts of the world as well. Whether as International Women’s Day in Russia during the month of March, or coming up in late May as Mothering Sunday in the United Kingdom, mother is almost universally honored with fresh cut flowers – or in the case of France, with flower-shaped cakes, too!

The worldwide demand for flowers is also driven by the fact that 20 percent of husbands give their wives flowers on Mother’s Day. It’s no wonder that Mother’s Day has blossomed into a major holiday that boasts a 1.9 billion a year flower expenditure.

A Budding Business

PrimeAir, a division of the Prime Group, is at the forefront of this logistics sector, ensuring that the most fresh and beautiful floral bouquets get into in the arms of loving mothers on their special day – and every day in between.

And although the peak Mother’s Day season just passed, PrimeAir continues to work with key customers such as Atlas Air, Emirates Sky Cargo, and about 750 flower importers and distributors in providing that important link between the source countries and the market.

Says Prime Group President Roger Paredes, “It is evident that the 2018 Mother’s Day season was highly successful, with record breaking volumes coming out of South America, especially Bogota and Quito.”

While the U.K. has yet to celebrate its annual Mother Day, the peak flower-shipping season is typically from the end of April to the first days of May.

Back in the Day

PrimeAir has a long history in the shipment of flowers. Paredes launched the company in 2001 in Ecuador representing several air cargo carriers involved in the transport of flowers from Quito.

“The expertise we gained in those early days, and have built upon, allows us to retain long-term customers while at the same time generate new business among companies. Especially those looking for the best in customer service, know-how, and logistical management of getting flowers to Miami and beyond.”

Flowers were always very important to PrimeAir. “Initially we supported operations between Quito and Miami only, but the exports just kept growing, so we soon entered the Amsterdam market,” says Paredes.

“As business continued to grow, we did too, by moving into Colombia, New York, and Los Angeles – pretty much following the flowers all over the world.”

Prime Air also services suppliers of other perishables product lines including as fresh produce and fish, but has also evolved into the shipment of a wide range of dry cargo, up to an including aircraft engines and heavy machinery.